NorthwestJourney.com - Moons, Planets, and Stars
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"Moons, Planets, and Stars"
 

Moons, Planets, and Stars ...
My collection of the Earth's Moon, Jupiter's Moons, the major Planets, and various Stars and Constellations, all photographed with a "superzoom camera" or digiscoped with a point-and-shoot and my birding spotting scopes.



Moon Phases, etc.


The Moon ...
The Moon is located 238,857 miles from the Earth. The moon rotates at 10 miles per hour compared to the earth's rotation of 1,000 miles per hour. About 49 moons would fit inside the Earth.

The Phases of the Moon ...
  • New Moon ...
  • Waxing Crescent Moon ...
  • First Quarter Moon ("Half Moon") ...
  • Waxing Gibbous Moon ...
  • Full Moon ...
  • Waning Gibbous Moon ...
  • Third Quarter Moon ("Half Moon") ...
  • Waning Crescent Moon ...
  • and then the New Moon once again.

Full Moons ("Farmer's Almanac", 2015) ...
  • January ... "Wolf Moon" ... This name came into use among tribes when in mid-winter the wolves found hunting difficult and began howling around the edges of campsites. This moon has also been known as the "Old Moon" or the "Moon After Yule". Occasionally it is known as the "Snow Moon", although that name is used more with February.

  • February ... "Snow Moon" ... February usually has the heaviest snowfall of the winter season. This moon is also called the "Hunger Moon", since the harsh winter weather made hunting difficult.

  • March ... "Worm Moon" ... As spring arrives and the ground warms up, worms appear. This moon is also known as the "Crow Moon", "Crust Moon" (the snow crusts over), "Sap Moon", and "Lenton Moon", referring to the last full Moon of winter.

  • April ... "Pink Moon" ... THis name came from the herb moss pink, or wild ground phlox, which is one of the earliest widespread flowers of the spring. Other names for this moon include "Full Sprouting Grass Moon" and "Egg Moon". It is also known as the "Fish Moon" when the Shad swim upstream to spawn.

  • May ... "Flower Moon" ... This moon is also known as the "Full Corn Planting Moon" or the "Milk Moon".

  • June ... "Strawberry Moon" ... Strawberries are picked during their short growing season in June. In Europe this moon is known as the "Rose Moon".

  • July ... "Buck Moon" ... July is normally the month when the new antlers of the buck deer begin to grow. This moon is also known as the "Full Hay Moon".

  • August ... "Sturgeon Moon" ... the easiest season to catch Sturgeon, also this moon is called the "Green Corn Moon" or the "Grain Moon".

  • September ... "Corn Moon" or "Harvest Moon" ... In two years out of three the "Harvest Moon" comes in September, but in some years it occurs in October.

  • October ... "Hunter's Moon", "Blood Moon", "Sanquine Moon" ... Every few years October's full moon is known as the "Harvest Moon".

  • November ... "Beaver Moon" ... November is the time to set the beaver traps before the swamps freeze. This moon is often referred to as the "Fosty Moon".

  • December ... "Cold Moon" or "Long Nights Moon" ... A cold month with very long nights. This moon is also known as the "Moon Before Yule".

"Blood Moon" ...
A full eclipse of the moon is known as a "Blood Moon". According to NASA ("ScienceCasts: A Tetrad of Lunar Eclipses", 2014), as the Earth blocks the light of the sun, the red glow of every sunset and sunrise circling the globe is cast upon the moon, turning the moon into a coppery red color.

"Blue Moon" ...
When a month has two full moons, the second full moon is called a "Blue Moon". Another definition of a blue moon is the third full moon in any season (quarter of year) containing 4 total full moons.

"Black Moon" ...
Occasionally the month of February has no full moons (with January or March having two) and it's New Moon is known as the "Black Moon".

"Cheshire Moon", "Wet Moon", and "Dry Moon" ...
A "Cheshire Moon" or "Wet Moon" is a lunar phase when the "horns" of the Waxing Crescent Moon point up at an angle, away from the horizon, so the moon takes on the appearance of a smile or a bowl. During the winter when the crescent lies nearly horizontal, it is a "Wet Moon" because the "bowl" can "hold water". During the summer, when the crescent moon is rising in an angled path and it's "horns" dip, it is known as a "Dry Moon" as the "bowl" allows the "water to drain out".


"Blue Moons"

"In recent years, people have been using the name Blue Moon for the second of two full moons in a single calendar month. An older definition of Blue Moon is that it's the third of four full moons in a single season. Someday, you might see a actual blue-colored moon. The term once in a blue moon used to mean something rare. Now that the rules for naming Blue Moons include several different possibilities, Blue Moons are pretty common! ...

Very rarely, a monthly Blue Moon (second of two full moons in one calendar month) and a seasonal Blue Moon (third of four full moons in one season) can occur in the same calendar year. But for this to happen you need 13 full moons in one calendar year AND 13 full moons between successive December solstices. This will next happen in the year 2048, when a monthly Blue Moon falls on January 31, and a seasonal Blue Moon on August 23."


Source:    "EarthSky.org" website, 2015.


Image, 2015, Full Moon, click to enlarge
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Full Moon, Vancouver, Washington, July 30, 2015, 10:47 p.m., PDT. Image shot with Nikon P600.


The "official" full moon is at 3:43 a.m., PDT, only 5 hours after this image was taken (10:47 on July 30th). This July 31st full moon is considered a "Blue Moon", as there was also a full moon on July 2nd.
Image, 2015, Full Moon, click to enlarge
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"Blue" Full Moon, Vancouver, Washington, July 30, 2015, 10:47 p.m., PDT. Image shot with Nikon P600, with blue filter on.


Blue filter. (GRIN)


Crescent Moons


July 4, 2019 ...

Image, 2019, Crescent Moon, click to enlarge Image, 2019, Crescent Moon, click to enlarge
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Two-day old Waxing Moon, Vancouver, Washington, July 4, 2019. Sony HX100v.
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Fourth of July Fireworks and crescent moon, Vancouver, Washington, July 4, 2019. Sony HX100v.
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Fourth of July Fireworks and crescent moon, Vancouver, Washington, July 4, 2019. Sony HX100v.
Image, 2019, Crescent Moon, click to enlarge
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Fourth of July Fireworks and crescent moon, Vancouver, Washington, July 4, 2019. Sony HX100v.


August 5, 2016 ... with Jupiter ...

Image, 2016, Crescent Moon, click to enlarge Image, 2016, Crescent Moon, click to enlarge
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Two-day old Waxing Moon, Vancouver, Washington, August 6, 2016. Jupiter in the left image. Nikon P900.


June 19, 2015, Crescent Moon ...
Friday, June 19.
"A waxing crescent Moon hangs low in the west after sunset this evening. It appears some 7° below Venus, while Jupiter stands the same distance to Venus' upper left. Naked eyes will show you our satellite's 13-percent-lit disk; you'll need a telescope to spy Venus' fatter crescent, which is 42 percent illuminated. Although Jupiter is only the third-brightest member of this trio, no other object elsewhere in the night sky rivals it."


Source:    "Astronomy.com" website, 2015.

Image, 2015, Crescent Moon, click to enlarge
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Crescent Moon, Canby, Oregon, June 19, 2015. View looking over livestock building, Clackamas County Fairgrounds. Venus and Jupiter not visible yet. Then clouds came in. Image shot with Nikon P600.


April 20, 2015, "Cheshire Moon" ...
"April 19, 2015 – you’ll want an unobstructed horizon in the direction of sunset, to maximize your chances of catching the young waxing crescent moon – and possibly the fading red planet Mars. The new moon was yesterday, April 18, so expect to see a whisker-thin lunar crescent low in the west after sunset – that is, if your evening twilight sky is clear. Binoculars may come in handy for the moon – and Mars. If you do see the ghostly smile of the whisker-thin crescent moon, it will be beautiful!"


Source:    "EarthSky.org" website, 2015.

Image, 2015, Crescent Moon, click to enlarge
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Two-day old grinning "Cheshire Moon", Vancouver, Washington, April 20, 2015. Image shot with Nikon P600.


Half Moons


Image, 2015, 1st Quarter Moon, click to enlarge
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1st Quarter Moon, July 23, 2015, 9:25 p.m. PDT. Image taken with Nikon P600.


The "official" first quarter moon happened at 9:05 p.m., PDT, on July 23, 2015.
Image, 2017, 1st Quarter Moon, click to enlarge
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1st Quarter Moon, July 30, 2017. Image taken with Nikon P900.
Image, 2017, Last Quarter Moon, click to enlarge
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Last Quarter Moon, August 16, 2017. Actual "Last Quarter Moon" was the day before, August 15th. Image taken with Canon Rebel, 300mm w/1.4.


Full Moons


Image, 2018, Moonrise, Vancouver, Washington, click to enlarge
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"Moonrise over the Lumber Yard", September 25, 2018. Vancouver, Washington.
Image, 2008, Full Moon, click to enlarge
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Full Moon, September 13, 2008. Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge, Ridgefield, Washington.
Image, 2015, Harvest Moon, click to enlarge
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"Harvest Moon", October 5, 2017. Image taken with Nikon P600.

"While the full Harvest Moon usually happens in September ... a late Harvest Moon this year tonight (Oct.5). The moon will be 100 percent full at 2:40 p.m. EDT. ... It will make a close pass by Neptune ... The Harvest Moon is defined as the full moon that falls closest to the autumn equinox, which happened on Sept. 22. Usually September's full moon is called the Harvest Moon, but this year, it just so happened that October's full moon is closer to the equinox. So, September's full moon was named the "Corn Moon" instead, and the next Hunter's Moon won't happen until October 2018." ["space.com" website, 2017]


"Supermoons"

(to come)

March 20, 2019 ...
A "Supermoon" on the First Day of Spring !!! ... The last time a full moon occurred on the First Day of Spring was in March 2000. The next one will be in March 2030.

Image, 2019, Supermoon on the First Day of Spring, click to enlarge Image, 2019, Supermoon on the First Day of Spring, click to enlarge
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"Supermoon" on the First Day of Spring !!! Vancouver, Washington, March 20, 2019. Image shot with Nikon P900.


"Supermoon" Triad, 2014

The summer of 2014 is the summer of the Supermoons !!!!!!

According to NASA --- "If you thought one supermoon was bright, how about three….? The full Moons of summer 2014—July 12th, August 10th, and Sept. 9th--will all be supermoons.

The scientific term for the phenomenon is "perigee moon." Full Moons vary in size because of the oval shape of the Moon's orbit. The Moon follows an elliptical path around Earth with one side ("perigee") about 50,000 km closer than the other ("apogee"). Full Moons that occur on the perigee side of the Moon's orbit seem extra big and bright.

This coincidence happens three times in 2014. On July 12th and Sept 9th the Moon becomes full on the same day as perigee. On August 10th it becomes full during the same hour as perigee—arguably making it an extra-super Moon."


July 12, 2014 ...
First of the three 2014 "supermoons". Missed it.

August 10, 2014 ...
Second of the three 2014 "supermoons". This moon is the "superest" of the "Supermoons" with the full moon being the closest to earth it will be this year. The full moon of August 10th was a meer 221,765 miles from the earth.

Image, 2014, Supermoon, click to enlarge
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"Supermoon", Vancouver, Washington, August 10, 2014 Image shot with Panasonic Lumix FZ200.


September 9, 2014 ...
September 9th is the third of the three 2014 "supermoons".

Image, 2014, Supermoon, click to enlarge
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"Supermoon Scenic", Vancouver, Washington, September 8, 2014 Image shot with Panasonic Lumix FZ200.


Lewis and Clark and a Lunar Eclipse

On January 15, 1805, while at Fort Mandan, North Dakota , Lewis and Clark witnessed a total eclipse of the moon.

"... between 12 & 3 oClock this morning we had a total eclips of the moon, a part of the observations necessary for our purpose in this eclips we got which is at 12h 57m 54s     Total Darkness of the moon     @ 1 44 00     End of total Darkness of This moon     @ 2 39 10     End of the eclips— ..." [Clark, January 15, 1805]


Lunar and Solar Eclipses

Because of the straight alignment needed of the Sun, Earth, and Moon, lunar and solar eclipses come in pairs. A lunar eclipse always takes place two weeks before or after a solar eclipse. For example, the beautiful September 27, 2015 Lunar Eclipse in conjunction with a Supermoon was preceded on September 13th by a partial Solar Eclipse.


Lunar Eclipse "Tetrad", 2014-2015

NASA describes the 2014-2015 lunar "tetrad" to be "series of 4 consecutive total eclipses occurring at approximately six month intervals." The first total eclipse was April 15, 2014, followed by one on October 8, 2014, one on April 4, 2015 (early hours of April 5th for us in the Pacific Northwest), and the last on September 27 (for us in the Pacific Northwest) and 28, 2015.

April 15, 2014 ...
First of the four total eclipses ("tetrad") visible in the Pacific Northwest in 2014 and 2015. Overcast evening with clouds coming in. We never saw totality nor the red color because of the clouds. Of special interest was the star Spica.

Image, 2014, Lunar Eclipse, click to enlarge
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Before, Lunar Eclipse, Vancouver, Washington, April 15, 2014, just after midnight. Image shot with Sony HX100v.
Image, 2014, Lunar Eclipse, click to enlarge
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Before, with Spica, Lunar Eclipse, Vancouver, Washington, April 15, 2014, just after midnight. Image shot with Sony HX100v.
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Almost total, Lunar Eclipse, Vancouver, Washington, April 15, 2014, just after midnight. Image shot with Sony HX100v.

Clouds came in right before eclipse went total.


October 8, 2014 ...
Second of the four total eclipses ("tetrad"). Beautiful views of the "blood moon". Of special note, the planet Uranus was within one degree of the moon.

Image, 2014, Lunar Eclipse, click to enlarge
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Total Lunar Eclipse, Vancouver, Washington, October 8, 2014, with planet Uranus (lower left) and star _____ (lower right). Note blue-green tinge of the planet Uranus. Image shot with Panasonic Lumix FZ200.
Image, 2014, Lunar Eclipse, click to enlarge
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Total Lunar Eclipse, Vancouver, Washington, October 8, 2014, with the planet Uranus. Note blue-green tinge of the planet. Image shot with Panasonic Lumix FZ200.


April 5, 2015 ...
April 5, 2015, was the third of the four total eclipses NASA describes as a 2014-2015 "tetrad". Totality was at 5:00 a.m. with overcast and clouds. No views.

September 28, 2015 ... Lunar Eclipse and the Supermoon !!!!
The fourth lunar eclipse of the "tetrad" provided fantastic views of the eclipse in conjuntion with a Supermoon !!! ... Here in the Pacific Northwest, this eclipse began shortly after moonrise making visibility difficult in the eastern haze. The Eclipse lasted over one hour allowing the moon to rise and providing great views. In the Portland area moonrise was at 6:55 p.m., PDT, and totally began at 7:11 p.m. Maximum coverage at 7:47 p.m. Totally lasted for 1 hour and 12 minutes with the moon moving out of the earth's shadow at 8:23 p.m., PDT.

"... the proverbial stars only align for this event once every few decades, making this phenomenon much rarer than a supermoon or a lunar eclipse separately. The last supermoon/lunar eclipse combination occurred in 1982 and the next won’t happen until 2033."


Source:    "Nasa.gov" website, 2015.

Image, 2015, Lunar Eclipse and the Supermoon, click to enlarge
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Street scene, Lunar Eclipse and the Supermoon !!! ... Vancouver, Washington, September 27, 2015, 7:42 p.m., PDT. Image shot with Nikon P600.
Image, 2015, Lunar Eclipse and the Supermoon, click to enlarge
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Street scene, Lunar Eclipse and the Supermoon !!! ... Vancouver, Washington, September 27, 2015, 7:59 p.m., PDT. Image shot with Nikon P600.
Image, 2015, Lunar Eclipse and the Supermoon, click to enlarge
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Street scene, Lunar Eclipse and the Supermoon !!! ... Vancouver, Washington, September 27, 2015, 8:00 p.m., PDT. Image shot with Nikon P600.
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Lunar Eclipse and the Supermoon !!! ... Vancouver, Washington, September 27, 2015, 8:22 p.m., PDT. Image shot with Nikon P600.
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Lunar Eclipse and the Supermoon !!! ... Vancouver, Washington, September 27, 2015, 8:29 p.m., PDT. Image shot with Nikon P600.


Lunar Eclipse, 2008

A total lunar eclipse occurred on the evening of Wednesday, February 20, and morning of Thursday, February 21, 2008. It was visible in the eastern evening sky on February 20 for all of North and South America, and on February 21 in the predawn western sky from most of Africa and Europe. Visible nearby was the planet Saturn (lower left) and the star Regulus (top). The February 20/21 total lunar eclipse was the first of the two lunar eclipses in 2008, with the second, the August 16, 2008 event being partial.

February 20, 2008 ...

Image, 2008, Eclipse, click to enlarge
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Before, Total eclipse of the moon, Vancouver, Washington, February 20, 2008. Image shot with Canon S5.
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Total eclipse of the moon, Vancouver, Washington, February 20, 2008. Image shot with Sony H5 with 1.6 "doubler".
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Closeup, Total eclipse of the moon, Vancouver, Washington, February 20, 2008. Image shot with Sony H5 with 1.6 "doubler".
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Saturn, Regulus, and the total eclipse of the moon, Vancouver, Washington, February 20, 2008. Image shot with Sony H5 with 1.6 "doubler".
Image, 2008, Eclipse, click to enlarge
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After, Total eclipse of the moon, Vancouver, Washington, February 20, 2008. Image shot with Sony H5 with 1.6 "doubler".
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After, Total eclipse of the moon, Vancouver, Washington, February 20, 2008. Image shot with Canon S5.


"Electric Blue Clouds, 2019"

The weekend of June 8 and 9, 2019, experienced an outbreak of rare brilliant blue "Noctilucent ("night shining") clouds".

Record-setting Noctilucent Clouds:

Last night (Sunday, June 9th) sky watchers in the San Francisco Bay Area of California witnessed an extraordinary display of nocticlucent clouds (NLCs) above the city lights. This marks one of the lowest-latitude sightings ever of NLCs. The clouds are typically confined to latitudes above +55N, yet San Francisco is at +38N. ...

Huge Outbreak of Noctilucent Clouds:

"Over the weekend, a huge outbreak of noctilucent clouds (NLCs) occurred as tendrils of frosted meteor smoke were sighted in Europe and the USA as far south as Oregon, Utah and California. ...

NLCs are Earth's highest clouds. Seeded by meteoroids, they float at the edge of space more than 80km [50 miles] above the planet's surface. The clouds are very cold and filled with tiny ice crystals. When sunbeams hit those crystals, they glow electric-blue.

Normally, NLCs are confined to polar regions, but this year people are seeing them at middle latitudes too. On June 8th and 9th the clouds appeared in California, Utah, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Washington, Montana, Iowa, Oregon, and Maine. Electric-blue ripples also blanketed much of Europe. ..."


Source:    "SpaceWeather.com", June 10, 2019.



Rare noctilucent clouds seen in ten states ... Sightings of these rare, shimmering clouds on the edge of space are on the rise. No one knows why.

"They form 50 miles up, in a region of the atmosphere called the mesosphere. All of our weather-producing clouds live far lower -- generally less than 50,000 feet -- in the troposphere.

Sightings have been pouring in from the western half of the nation. ...

At first glance, noctilucent clouds may resemble the high, wispy cirrus clouds that we often see over the Lower 48. ... But noctilucent clouds are different. ... "they were kind of a bright, light blue," ... "They were brilliant".

SpaceWeather.com described a "huge outbreak" of the clouds over the weekend with sightings in nine states, in addition to Oklahoma, and parts of Europe.

Because they soar so high, noctilucent clouds catch sunlight well after dark. ... they shine a brilliant blue up to two hours after sunset or before sunrise.

It's thought that the clouds are instigated by meteor smoke. Any time you see a shooting star, the instigating space pebble deposits a thin veil of fine dust behind it as it burns up. The tiny particulates may serve as "nuclei" around wich ice can form.

That source of water that hight remains a mystery, however. After all, ordinary clouds are made of condensed water vapor or ice crystals, but noctilucent clouds form at hieghts thought to be nearly devoid of moisture. Temperatures at that level dip below minus-190 degrees, and the colder the air gets, the less moisture it can hold.

Noctilucent clouds are most common near the poles. They're rarely seen below 50 degrees latitude, but they've been venturing outside of their usual bounds much more frequently in the pastdecade. A potential reason? Climate change.

It's not just carbon dioxide that humans pump into the atmosphere. It's methane too. ... In other words, more methane means more moisture high up. "This extra water vapor is then available to grow ice crystals for [noctilucent clouds]". ..."


Source:    "The Washington Post", June 10, 2019, "Rare noctilucent clouds seen in ten states", by Matthew Cappucci.


Image, 2019, click to enlarge Image, 2019, click to enlarge
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"Blue Clouds", Vancouver, Washington, June 9, 2019, 10:00-ish p.m. PDT. Nikon S9700.


Clouds

Image, 2008, click to enlarge
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"Lenticular clouds" ... Mount Hood, Oregon, February 12, 2008. View from Fishers Landing, Washington. Image taken February 12, 2008, approximately 8:00 a.m. PST.
Image, 2018, click to enlarge
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"Popcorn Clouds" ... Vancouver, Washington, October 3, 2018. Cirrocumulus. Nikon S9700.


International Space Station

Video, 2017, click to enlarge
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Video (wmv), International Space Station, Vancouver, Washington, May 27, 2017, 9:13 p.m. PDT. ISS goes from middle right to middle bottom, "wmv" format, 9.14 seconds, Sony HX100v, jiggles and dips a result of being handheld on monopod.
Image, 2016, click to enlarge
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International Space Station, Vancouver, Washington, August 12, 2016, 10:08 p.m. PDT. ISS magnitude 3.3, 83degrees. Sony HX300, 10 seconds, f5.6, ISO-80, image lightened on computer.


Stars and Constellations

  • Big Dipper (Ursa Major) ...
  • Cassiopeia ...
  • Cepheus ...
  • Little Dipper (Ursa Minor) ...
  • Orion ...


Image, 2016, click to enlarge
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Big Dipper (Ursa Major), Vancouver, Washington, August 27, 2016, 9:10 p.m. PDT. Sony HX100v.
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Cassiopeia, Vancouver, Washington, August 27, 2016, 9:25 p.m. PDT. Sony HX100v.
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Cassiopeia, Vancouver, Washington, August 12, 2016, 1:00 a.m. PDT. Sony HX100v.
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Cepheus, Vancouver, Washington, August 11, 2016, 10:30 p.m. PDT. Sony HX100v.
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Little Dipper (Ursa Minor), Vancouver, Washington, August 11, 2016, 10:35 p.m. PDT. Sony HX100v.
Image, 2017, click to enlarge
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Orion, Vancouver, Washington, January 23, 2017, 9:21 p.m. PST. Sony HX100v.


Planets
Venus


December 6, 2016 ... Lineup of the Moon, Mars, and Venus

Tuesday, December 6.
"In late twilight, the Moon, Mars, and Venus form a long diagonal line in the south to southwest. Well below the Moon twinkles Fomalhaut."


Source:    "skyandtelescope.com" website, 2016.

Image, 2016, Moon, Mars, and Venus, click to enlarge
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Lineup of the Moon, Mars, and Venus, December 6, 2016, approximately 6:00 p.m. PST. Image shot with Nikon P600.

Mars was red/orange in "real life", which unfortunately the camera did not pick up, and, although bleeding out in the image, the Moon was less than one day away from 1/4 phase.


June 30 and July 1, 2015 ... Conjunction of Venus and Jupiter

Tuesday, June 30.
"On June 30 and July 1, 2015, look for the sky’s brightest and second-brightest planets to stage their closest conjunction until August, 2016. Venus and Jupiter will be less than one-half degree apart. That’s less than the moon’s diameter on our sky’s dome."


Source:    "Earthsky.org" website, 2015.

Image, 2015, Venus and Jupiter, click to enlarge
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Venus and Jupiter, June 30, 2015, 10:40 p.m. PDT. Image shot with Nikon P600.

Jupiter's moons, left to right: Ganymede, Europa, Io, and Callisto, ("skyandtelescope.com" website, 2015).
Image, 2015, Venus and Jupiter, click to enlarge
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Looking west, Venus and Jupiter, July 1, 2015, 10:10 p.m. PDT. Image shot with Nikon P600.
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Venus and Jupiter, July 1, 2015, 10:27 p.m. PDT. Image shot with Nikon P600.

Jupiter's moons, left to right: Europa, Ganymede, and Io, ("skyandtelescope.com" website, 2015).


Mars


July 4, 2016 ...

Image, 2016, click to enlarge
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Mars, Vancouver, Washington, July 4, 2016. Nikon P600, ISO-1600, f5.6, 0.77 seconds.


Jupiter


July 1, 2015 ... Lunar Eclipse of Jupiter's moon "Callisto"

Image, 2015, Venus and Jupiter, click to enlarge
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Jupiter and it's four visible moons, July 1, 2015, 10:06, PDT. Image shot with Nikon P600.

Jupiter's moons, left to right: Europa, Ganymede, Io, and Callisto, ("skyandtelescope.com" website, 2015).
Image, 2015, Venus and Jupiter, click to enlarge
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Jupiter and three of it's four visible moons, July 1, 2015, 10:26 p.m. PDT. Image shot with Nikon P600.

Jupiter's moons, left to right: Europa, Ganymede, and Io. Callisto was eclipsed by Jupiter's shadow at 10:18 p.m. PDT, and then re-appeared at 2:58 a.m. PDT, on July 2, 2015. ("skyandtelescope.com" website, 2015).
Image, 2015, Jupiter, click to enlarge
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Lunar Eclipse of "Callisto", July 1, 2015, 10:06 and 10:26 p.m. PDT. Image shot with Nikon P600.

Jupiter's moons, left to right: Europa, Ganymede, Io, and Callisto. Callisto was eclipsed by Jupiter's shadow at 10:18 p.m. PDT, and then re-appeared at 2:58 a.m. PDT, on July 2, 2015. ("skyandtelescope.com" website, 2015).


June 30 and July 5, 2015 ...

Image, 2015, Venus and Jupiter, click to enlarge
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Jupiter and it's four visible moons, June 30, 2015, 10:40 p.m. PDT. Image shot with Nikon P600, 0.77sec, f5.6, ISO-1600.

Jupiter's moons, left to right: Ganymede, Europa, Io, and Callisto, ("skyandtelescope.com" website, 2015).
Image, 2015, Venus and Jupiter, click to enlarge
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Jupiter and it's four visible moons, July 5, 2015. Image shot with Nikon P600, 0.5sec, f5.6, -0.3, ISO-1600.

Jupiter's moons, left to right: Callisto, Europa, Ganymede, and Io, ("skyandtelescope.com" website, 2015).


Saturn


July 5, 2016 ...

Image, 2016, Saturn, click to enlarge
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Saturn, July 5, 2016, 10:42 p.m. PDT. DIGISCOPED, Canon G9.


July 26 and 27, 2015 ...

Image, 2015, Saturn, click to enlarge
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Saturn, July 26, 2015, 10:06 p.m. PDT. DIGISCOPED, 66mm spotting scope zoomed to 60x with Canon G9 held to eyepiece, 1/20th, f2.8, ISO-1600, image reduced to 66% via computer.
Image, 2015, Saturn, click to enlarge
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Saturn, July 27, 2015, 10:05 p.m. PDT. DIGISCOPED, 77mm spotting scope zoomed to 60x with Canon G9 held to eyepiece, 1/40th, f2.8, ISO-1600, image at 100%.


Uranus


October 8, 2014 ...
Beautiful views of the "blood moon" with the planet Uranus was within one degree of the moon.

Image, 2014, Lunar Eclipse, click to enlarge
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Total Lunar Eclipse, Vancouver, Washington, October 8, 2014, with planet Uranus (lower left) and star _____ (lower right). Note blue-green tinge of the planet Uranus. Image shot with Panasonic Lumix FZ200.
Image, 2014, Lunar Eclipse, click to enlarge
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Total Lunar Eclipse, Vancouver, Washington, October 8, 2014, with the planet Uranus. Note blue-green tinge of the planet. Image shot with Panasonic Lumix FZ200.


2017 Solar Eclipse

Albany, Oregon, August 21, 2017.

Image, 2017, Total Solar Eclipse, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
"Sunspots", Total Solar Eclipse of the Sun, Albany, Oregon, August 21, 2017. Canon t6s, 300mm, 1/400, f5.0, ISO200, -1.7 steps, solar filter.
Image, 2017, Total Solar Eclipse, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
"Bite out of the Sun", Total Solar Eclipse of the Sun, Albany, Oregon, August 21, 2017. Canon t6s, 300mm, 1/160, f4.0, ISO200, -0.3 steps, solar filter.
Image, 2017, Total Solar Eclipse, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
"Half", Total Solar Eclipse of the Sun, Albany, Oregon, August 21, 2017. Canon t6s, 300mm w/1.4 (420mm), 1/50, f5.6, ISO200, solar filter.
Image, 2017, Total Solar Eclipse, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
"Cheshire Cat Grin", Total Solar Eclipse of the Sun, Albany, Oregon, August 21, 2017. Canon t6s, 300mm w/1.4 (420mm), 1/100, f5.6, ISO200, solar filter.
Image, 2017, Total Solar Eclipse, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
"Sliver", Total Solar Eclipse of the Sun, Albany, Oregon, August 21, 2017. Canon t6s, 300mm w/1.4 (420mm), 1/100, f5.6, ISO200, solar filter.
Image, 2017, Total Solar Eclipse, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Total Solar Eclipse of the Sun, Albany, Oregon, August 21, 2017. Nikon P600, 161mm, 1/250, f5.6, ISO220, -2 steps.
Image, 2017, Total Solar Eclipse, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Total Solar Eclipse of the Sun, Albany, Oregon, August 21, 2017. Nikon P600, 108mm, 1/250, f5.6, ISO360, -2 steps.
Image, 2017, Total Solar Eclipse, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
"Diamond Ring", Total Solar Eclipse of the Sun, Albany, Oregon, August 21, 2017. Nikon P600, 161mm, 1/400, f5.6, ISO100, -2 steps.
Image, 2017, Total Solar Eclipse, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
"Solar Prominence" with the "Diamond Ring", Total Solar Eclipse of the Sun, Albany, Oregon, August 21, 2017. Nikon P600, 161mm, 1/400, f5.6, ISO100, -2 steps.
Image, 2017, Total Solar Eclipse, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
"Sliver", Total Solar Eclipse of the Sun, Albany, Oregon, August 21, 2017. Canon t6s, 300mm w/1.4 (420mm), 1/100, f5.6, ISO200, solar filter.
Image, 2017, Total Solar Eclipse, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
"Sliver", Total Solar Eclipse of the Sun, Albany, Oregon, August 21, 2017. Canon t6s, 300mm w/1.4 (420mm), 1/100, f5.6, ISO200, solar filter.
Image, 2017, Total Solar Eclipse, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
"Half", Total Solar Eclipse of the Sun, Albany, Oregon, August 21, 2017. Nikon P600, (236mm), 1/160, f6.3, ISO400, solar filter.


1979 Solar Eclipse and 1986 Haley's Comet

On February 26, 1979, I had the pleasure of seeing a total solar eclipse. We had driven to the Ellensburg area and parked near a hill off the freeway. In the Spring 1986 Gene and I went to Hawai'i to see Haley's Comet where it rained nearly the entire three weeks and the comet had lost its tail. The following are scans of the frame photographs from my wall. Original images are on 35mm slide film.

Image, 1979, Solar Eclipse, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Total Solar Eclipse of the Sun, Ellensburg area, February 26, 1979. Image is scan from picture on wall. Original taken with 35mm slide film.
Image, 1979, Haley's Comet, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Haley's Comet (tailless, bluish on left) as seen from Hawai'i, Spring 1986. Image is scan from picture on wall. Original taken with 35mm slide film.





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